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Revision 6 . . (edit) April 1, 2007 3:40 pm by Simons Mith [Categories]
Revision 5 . . (edit) September 18, 2004 4:57 am by JLE
Revision 1 . . September 18, 2004 4:47 am by JLE [Sorry it's a long one. But I'm setting up the idea of making a copy of the "Goldfinger: The Missing Chapter", still available on what's left of the Delphi server...]
  

Difference (from prior major revision) (minor diff, author diff)

Changed: 9,10c9,11
Fortunes were - and still are - made and lost: it was said that Sydney Hall once turned up at a casino with no more than 50 assorted tokens of blue, red and black plus three bronzes, and did not leave till four days later (going almost completely without sleep except for nodding off for a couple of hours occasionally, and living mostly on the finer blends of whiskey), by which time he had actually run the casino's bank completely out of all but the rarest of tokens, bankrupted three other players and had death threats (cheerfully ignored) made against him by two others, and was richer by tokens of both "conventional" and "unconventional" types, to the value of several million - most of which, having little use for, he donated straight back to the casino or the players who had lost them (with the exception of those that had threatened him, who received nothing), out of all the "conventional" types, even gold.
When asked what he was up to, his reply - "I've never actually *seen* an obsidian token before and I was hoping to push somebody into playing one" - entered the annals of legend. He did, indeed, see one - in fact, he saw ten, and won nine of them, all on various side-bets or struggles for control of comparatively minor parts of the board, without ever actually hitting Mornington Crescent himself: and proceeded to use them to great effect as part of his official token stash in the World Championships the following year, winning in the completely different "championship" style of play. Sadly, Hall was the last of the true maestros of both the major styles of Mornington Crescent play: after him, the styles began to diverge so far that no players have crossed the divide with any real success.
Fortunes were - and still are - made and lost: it was said that Sydney Hall once turned up at a casino with no more than 50 assorted tokens of blue, red and black plus three bronzes, and did not leave till four days later (going almost completely without sleep except for nodding off for a couple of hours occasionally, and living mostly on the finer blends of whiskey), by which time he had actually run the casino's bank completely out of all but the rarest of tokens, bankrupted three other players and had death threats (cheerfully ignored) made against him by two others, and was richer by tokens of both "conventional" and "unconventional" types, to the value of several million - most of which, having little use for, he donated straight back to the casino or the players who had lost them (with the exception of those that had threatened him, who received nothing), giving back tokens of all the "conventional" types - even gold.

When asked what he was up to, his reply - "I've never actually *seen* an obsidian token before and I was hoping to push somebody into playing one" - entered the annals of legend. He did, indeed, see one - in fact, he saw ten, and won nine of them, all on various side-bets or struggles for control of comparatively minor parts of the board, without ever actually hitting Mornington Crescent himself: and proceeded to use them to great effect as part of his official token stash in the World Championships the following year, winning in the completely different "championship" style of play. Sadly, Hall was the last of the true maestros of both the major styles of Mornington Crescent play: after him, the styles began to diverge so far that no players have crossed the divide with any real success.

Changed: 14,16c15,23
In fact, probably the best-known person to have played Mornington Crescent in a casino, since Hall's retirement, was a man famous for entirely different reasons than playing MC (and, in fact, did little more than break even, over the course of his MC gaming career). Ian Fleming originally intended the first encounter between James Bond and Auric Goldfinger to take place over the Mornington Crescent tables: and, drawing on his own considerable experience, this was how it turned out. (In fact, the dialogue may have been different, but the actual moves are drawn from the end of a game that Fleming himself played in.)
Unfortunately, before "Goldfinger" was ever published, Fleming had a disagreement with MC Player magazine, after receiving a critical review of an article he submitted for publication: he actually wrote on the subject of this divide in the Great Game's history, between those that "played to win" in the championships (which he refused to enter) and those that "played for tokens" to win them off other players - lamenting the fact that players nowadays preferred to buy their tokens from shops rather than win them from other players. If he had confined himself to his initial argument, that each "non-conventional" token bought from a shop increases the number of such tokens in the game, and devalues the price at which they are bought in the shops, therefore such tokens should also decrease in the value and effect they have on the game itself, he might have had a less scathing review: but Fleming went beyond this, deriding the championship-winning records of several players (mentioned by name, and including all of the top twenty in the world rankings) as being "bought rather than truly earned".
After such a comment, critical bile from most of the "competitive" MC world was pretty much inevitable. In disgust, Fleming gave up the game completely, destroyed all his tokens, ripped out the chapter containing the encounter, and replaced it with the now-famous game of golf. Copies of the Missing Chapter are, consequently rare: they would be impossible to find at all, were it not for the fact that at least one proof copy (sent before the deletion) got lost in the post on the way to the publisher, and ended up at the house of a man whose real name is not publicly known but goes by the pseudonym of "Mr Frederick Acre", who is alleged - although nothing has ever been proved - to have since made a fortune's worth of rare or expensive token types (and not one single penny of actual money) from selling copies.
In fact, probably the best-known person to have played Mornington Crescent in a casino, since Hall's retirement, was a man famous for entirely different reasons than playing MC (and, in fact, did little more than break even, over the course of his MC gaming career). Ian Fleming originally intended the first encounter between James Bond and Auric Goldfinger to take place over the Mornington Crescent tables: and, drawing on his own considerable experience, he created a highly believable game, played on one of the archaic rulesets frequently preferred in the casino. (In fact, the dialogue may have been different, but the actual moves may even be drawn from a game that Fleming himself played in.)

Unfortunately, before "Goldfinger" was ever published, Fleming had a disagreement with MC Player magazine, after receiving a critical review of an article he submitted for publication: he actually wrote on the subject of this divide in the Great Game's history, between those that "played to win" in the championships (which he refused to enter) and those that "played for tokens" to win them off other players - lamenting the fact that players nowadays preferred to buy their tokens from shops rather than win them from other players. If he had confined himself to his initial argument, that each "non-conventional" token bought from a shop increases the number of such tokens in the game, and devalues the price at which they are bought in the shops, therefore such tokens should also decrease in the value and effect they have on the game itself, he might have had a less scathing review: but Fleming went beyond this, deriding the championship-winning records of several players (mentioned by name, and including all of the top twenty in the world rankings) as being "bought rather than truly earned".

After such a comment, critical bile from most of the "competitive" MC world was pretty much inevitable. In disgust, Fleming gave up the game completely, destroyed all his tokens, ripped out the chapter containing the encounter, and replaced it with the now-famous game of golf. Copies of the Missing Chapter are, consequently rare: they would be impossible to find at all, were it not for the fact that at least one proof copy (sent before the deletion) got lost in the post on the way to the publisher, and ended up at the house of a man whose real name is not publicly known but goes by the pseudonym of "Mr Frederick Acre", who is alleged - although nothing has ever been proved - to have since made a fortune's worth of rare or expensive token types (and not one single penny of actual money) from selling copies.

[JLE]


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